Monthly Archives: May 2016

Fast Sell Your Car Tips

unduhan-26Selling your car today is a different experience than it was 10 or 15 years ago, thanks to the tools available on the Internet. Online appraisal tools and Internet classified ads have made the process faster and more convenient.

Edmunds.com has an in-depth 10-step guide to selling your car, but this article condenses the selling process into five simple steps that can help you turn your used car into cash in the shortest time possible. You can also print out this article and use it as a checklist to keep you on track.

1. Research and Price Your Car
Picking the right asking price can mean the difference between getting multiple calls right off the bat and having your phone not ring at all. In order to come up with an effective asking price, you’ll first need to find out what the car is worth and how much other people are asking for similar cars. The Edmunds used carsection has an appraisal tool that you can use to get a True Market Value (TMV®) private-party price. This figure is adjusted for a number of factors including mileage, condition, options and the region in which the car is being sold.

Next, search for vehicles similar to yours at online classified sites such as AutoTrader.com, Craigslist andeBay Classifieds. This will give you a better idea of the price range for your particular model and whether the number you had in your head is in the ballpark. Then, use the same technique you see at department stores to price your car competitively. In other words, if you’re thinking of a $20,000 asking price, list the car at $19,900. Finally, be sure to leave a little wiggle room when setting the price. Ask for more than what you actually want to get for the car and keep in mind that people tend to negotiate in big chunks ($500-$1,000) rather than small increments ($100-$200). Set your price accordingly.

An alternate method would be to take your car to CarMax for an appraisal. CarMax’s offer is good for seven days and you can use its estimate as a baseline for your asking price. Or if you’re comfortable with the offer, you can accept it and save yourself the rest of the steps.

2. Advertise Your Car
AutoTrader.com is one of the more commonly used sites, but it charges a fee to list your car. You can save a few bucks by advertising for free on eBay Classifieds or Craigslist. Or you can cast the widest net by having both an AutoTrader.com ad and a free classified ad. If you deal with Craigslist, we suggest you take a look at its tips to avoid scams. It is also good advice for any online classifieds site.

You should consider other ways of advertising, such as posting a “For Sale” sign in the car’s window. This tried-and-true technique can still yield results. It’s also common these days to use Facebook or Twitter to let your friends know you are selling your car.

When you post your ad online, make sure you upload plenty of photos of the car from all angles. As you write the description, make sure to mention if the car has any scratches, dents or mechanical issues. Follow the steps in this article if you need help with the photos. You can also use a few key phrases to communicate how eager you are to sell the car. “OBO” (“or best offer”) indicates that you are willing to entertain offers below the stated price. “Asking price” communicates the feeling that you will negotiate. “Firm” is less common, but it indicates that you aren’t in a hurry to sell the car — you are most interested in getting your price.

You can also upload a video of the car to YouTube so potential buyers can do a virtual walk-around of the car. Include a link in your Craigslist or eBay listing (AutoTrader doesn’t permit links, unfortunately).

Another alternative is online peer-to-peer car selling and buying, including such companies as Beepi, Carvana, Tred and Zipflip. Each operates a little differently, so check the sites for details of their policies and services for sellers and buyers.

3. Show Your Car
If you’ve done all the previous steps, you should receive a number of calls about the car. Now someone wants to see it in person. Bear in mind that when you sell your car, people will not only be evaluating the car, but also the person who owns it. Buyers will feel more comfortable if they know you took good care of the car and answer their questions openly. Make sure the car has been washed and that you’ve removed all your belongings from the inside. It is also a good idea to have your maintenance records ready to show interested parties.

Potential buyers will want to test-drive the car. Ride along with them so you can answer questions. Some buyers will want to take the car to a mechanic to have it inspected. If you have a report from your mechanic, this might put their doubts to rest. But if they still want to take the car to their mechanic, this is a reasonable request.

Car On Safely Sell Tips

A man who listed his car for sale on Craigslist is killed by a man who wanted to strip the turbocharger and other parts from the vehicle.

A New York man lists his BMW online, only to be stabbed and stuffed into thecar’s trunk by an ex-con who arranged a meeting on the pretext of buying the vehicle.

Although such stories show the potential danger of private-party used-car sales, don’t let these extreme cases deter you. You can safely sell your used car and maximize its valu by taking the right preventive measures.

Craigslist, one of several sites that facilitate private-party car sales, says that its buyers and sellers complete billions of transactions with an “extremely low” incidence of violent crime. Still, selling your car does put you at risk of fraud, scams, robbery and possible personal attacks.

The safety advice in this article comes from the police and my own personal experience selling more than 50 cars from Edmunds’ long-term test fleet. There’s also another very knowledgeable but less obvious source ofgood tips: real-estate agents. They often meet strangers to arrange a sale and sometimes the transactions put them in vulnerable positions. Just like private-party car sellers.

The Big 4 Tips for Car-Selling Safety
1. Vet callers thoroughly. When Steve Goddard, former president of the California Association of Realtors, takes a call from someone he’s never met, he makes sure the caller is serious about buying a property and isn’t trying to lure him into a trap to rob him. “I ask them lots of questions about what they are looking for and what their needs are,” he says. “The more I engage them in conversation, the more you get a feel for them.”

2. Don’t go to a meeting alone. It’s that simple, says Rico Fernandez, a sergeant with the Long Beach Police Department in California. “Take someone with you. People are less apt to harm you if there is someone else there.”

3. Meet in a public place. Goddard says that when he meets someone for the first time, he does so at his office. While you can’t do that when you’re selling a car, you can arrange to meet would-be buyers in a public place, such as a shopping mall parking lot.

4. Trust your gut. Qualifying callers is a combination of intuition and experience, Goddard says. And if you’re not comfortable meeting with strangers under any circumstances, you should turn the sale over to an auto broker or trade in the vehicle. You’ll have to accept that you might not get the best deal, but peace of mind is priceless. So is your life.

Screening 101
If you do a good job screening buyers before you meet them face-to-face, selling your car will go much more smoothly. Listing your car on Craigslist or Autotrader.com will bring e-mails, text messages and calls from interested parties. Use your intuition to spot anything suspicious about these prospective buyers:

  • Don’t be overly eager for a sale or you might miss a warning sign. If a caller seems suspicious to you, simply hang up.
  • Only schedule a test-drive with serious buyers you are able to reach by phone. Invite questions when you talk with them. This prevents you from having to show the car to someone who isn’t really interested, or someone you’d rather not deal with. If the caller doesn’t seem to know what to ask, volunteer the basics about the car: year, make, model, color, number of doors, number of miles on the car and its key features.
  • Beware of professional buyers who just want to “flip” cars, which means reselling them quickly at a profit. Flippers bargain aggressively. You can usually identify these callers because they quickly want to get to your lowest selling price. If you have doubts, ask them if they’re buying to resell. While flippers might not pose a hazard to your personal safety, it’s better to avoid dealing with them.
  • Ask who is coming on the test-drive. Evasive answers might indicate that the caller is setting up a trap.
  • Tell the caller you will want to see a driver license before the test-drive. This might discourage anyone with criminal intentions from going any further.